National Geographic
@natgeo

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

Posts: 17.545

Followed: 128

Followers: 88.690.075

28m ago
@natgeo
Play
A collaboration with @amivitale | Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e), in northern Kenya is the first ever community-owned and run elephant sanctuary in Africa. The sanctuary provides a safe place for injured elephants to heal and later, be returned back to the wild. 
Reteti operates in partnership with Conservation International (@conservationorg) who provide critical operational support and work to scale the Reteti community-centered model to create lasting impacts worldwide. 
Learn more about how you can get involved and help support this vital initiative by following @amivitale @r.e.s.c.u.e & @conservationorg

This film is a collaboration by @amivitale @danehenrydigital and @brettlowell.

@nrt_kenya @kenyawildlifeservice @lewa_wildlife @sandiegozoo @tusk_org @thephotosociety @natgeo @coreyrichproductions @novusselect #protectelephants #bekindtoelephants #DontLetThemDisappear #elephants #saveelephants #stoppoaching #kenya #northernkenya #magicalkenya #whyilovekenya #africa #everydayafrica #photojournalism #amivitale
A collaboration with @amivitale | Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e), in northern Kenya is the first ever community-owned and run elephant sanctuary in Africa. The sanctuary provides a safe place for injured elephants to heal and later, be returned back to the wild. Reteti operates in partnership with Conservation International (@conservationorg) who provide critical operational support and work to scale the Reteti community-centered model to create lasting impacts worldwide. Learn more about how you can get involved and help support this vital initiative by following @amivitale@r.e.s.c.u.e & @conservationorg This film is a collaboration by @amivitale@danehenrydigital and @brettlowell.@nrt_kenya@kenyawildlifeservice@lewa_wildlife@sandiegozoo@tusk_org@thephotosociety@natgeo@coreyrichproductions@novusselect#protectelephants#bekindtoelephants#DontLetThemDisappear#elephants#saveelephants#stoppoaching#kenya#northernkenya#magicalkenya#whyilovekenya#africa#everydayafrica#photojournalism#amivitale
15308 likes 80 comments
3h ago
@natgeo
Photo by @joelsartore |
Meet the Tanzanian tailless whip scorpion. You might remember this kind of animal from the Harry Potter films when, in the Goblet of Fire, it demonstrated the unforgivable curses. Whip scorpions use their long, modified legs to sense the world around them. They like to stay in one spot but can move quickly if disturbed. The species photographed here is from the Butterfly Pavilion at the Albuquerque BioPark in New Mexico and is one-year-old, although they can live up to ten years. The Pavilion is working to bring more attention to understudied and misunderstood arthropods and arachnids in order to create empathy and concern for their habitats around the world. #PhotoArk #whipscorpion #AlbuquerqueBioPark #harrypotter
Photo by @joelsartore | Meet the Tanzanian tailless whip scorpion. You might remember this kind of animal from the Harry Potter films when, in the Goblet of Fire, it demonstrated the unforgivable curses. Whip scorpions use their long, modified legs to sense the world around them. They like to stay in one spot but can move quickly if disturbed. The species photographed here is from the Butterfly Pavilion at the Albuquerque BioPark in New Mexico and is one-year-old, although they can live up to ten years. The Pavilion is working to bring more attention to understudied and misunderstood arthropods and arachnids in order to create empathy and concern for their habitats around the world. #PhotoArk#whipscorpion#AlbuquerqueBioPark#harrypotter
150111 likes 2903 comments
6h ago
@natgeo
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). An ancient patio where Ancestral Puebloans lived 800+ years ago.  Cedar Mesa, Southern Utah in what was briefly #BearsEarsNationalMonument.  From an assignment for the magazine covering the recent National Monument reductions of Bears Ears and #EscalanteGrandStaircase, Utah.  If you ever find a site like this please #VisitWithRespect!  @cedarmesafriends is a great resource for site etiquette.  Never enter or lean on any ruins, leave all artifacts no matter how small, and never reveal specific location information!  For more images from the #BearsEars area follow @argonautphoto!
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). An ancient patio where Ancestral Puebloans lived 800+ years ago. Cedar Mesa, Southern Utah in what was briefly #BearsEarsNationalMonument. From an assignment for the magazine covering the recent National Monument reductions of Bears Ears and #EscalanteGrandStaircase, Utah. If you ever find a site like this please #VisitWithRespect! @cedarmesafriends is a great resource for site etiquette. Never enter or lean on any ruins, leave all artifacts no matter how small, and never reveal specific location information! For more images from the #BearsEars area follow @argonautphoto!
260519 likes 699 comments
12h ago
@natgeo
Photo @tbfrost | Words by @paulrosolie | What makes anacondas so hard to study is they spend most of their time below water or mud. This means that even giant individuals can be impossible to detect. We had been searching for over thirty-five days in swamps and on rivers, without finding a single one. This 7-8ft individual came to us, strangely enough, by way of Instagram! First sighted by researchers who posted the photo, it was then discovered by Ecuadorian photographer @luksth , who alerted us. We traveled for 2 hours up the Tambopata River here in Peru to observe her. What made it extra exciting is she had just eaten an agouti (a house-cat-sized Amazonian rodent) below a mammal colpa or clay lick. It wasn’t the largest anaconda we’ve ever seen,  but what is significant here is her behavior. Anacondas appear to travel long distances up forest streams to access mammal colpas (salt deposits) where the prey is abundant. This is a new behavior for an apex predator that we still know very little about. Just part of an ongoing effort to better understand the numbers, habits, ecology, and intelligence of these mysterious giants.

To see a photo of the ENTIRE snake with food in her belly, follow @tbfrost
Photo @tbfrost | Words by @paulrosolie | What makes anacondas so hard to study is they spend most of their time below water or mud. This means that even giant individuals can be impossible to detect. We had been searching for over thirty-five days in swamps and on rivers, without finding a single one. This 7-8ft individual came to us, strangely enough, by way of Instagram! First sighted by researchers who posted the photo, it was then discovered by Ecuadorian photographer @luksth , who alerted us. We traveled for 2 hours up the Tambopata River here in Peru to observe her. What made it extra exciting is she had just eaten an agouti (a house-cat-sized Amazonian rodent) below a mammal colpa or clay lick. It wasn’t the largest anaconda we’ve ever seen, but what is significant here is her behavior. Anacondas appear to travel long distances up forest streams to access mammal colpas (salt deposits) where the prey is abundant. This is a new behavior for an apex predator that we still know very little about. Just part of an ongoing effort to better understand the numbers, habits, ecology, and intelligence of these mysterious giants. To see a photo of the ENTIRE snake with food in her belly, follow @tbfrost
153839 likes 409 comments
15h ago
@natgeo
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - barn owl chick, Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland- on our rounds today we found this little guy had fallen out of one of the nest boxes, he’s now back with his 5 siblings. I’ll be watching them grow and then fledge over coming weeks. You can just see the characteristic heart shaped face, and the flight feathers underneath the fluffy down which helps them keep warm, and therefore allows the female to leave the nest and help the male with hunting duties. The barn owl is nocturnal over most of its range, but in Britain and some Pacific islands, it also hunts by day. Barn owls specialise in hunting animals on the ground and nearly all of their food consists of small mammals which they locate by sound. They mate for life unless one of the pair is killed, when a new pair bond may be formed. Breeding takes place at varying times of year according to locality, with a clutch, averaging about four eggs, being laid in a nest in a hollow tree, old building or fissure in a cliff. Most bird species don’t start to incubate their eggs until the clutch is complete, so the eggs hatch at more or less the same time. But Barn Owls begin incubation as soon as the first egg is laid and lay additional eggs over a period of around 8-21 days. After 31-32 days’ incubation, the eggs hatch every 2-3 days, usually in the order they were laid. This is termed “asynchronous” hatching. The age difference between the oldest and youngest nestlings can be as much as three weeks. This age variation serves to reduce the peak in food demand and spread it over a longer period. The female does all the incubation and the male provides all the food until the young are around 3 weeks old which is roughly the age of this owlet. Barn owls do not strictly speaking build a nest but rather lay their eggs onto the previous years nest debris, a compacted layer of owl pellets, having nest boxes distributed around the Estate always the owls to return the same site and the estate is therefore more easily able to monitor the health of populations - To see more from this wild and wonderful landscape follow me here @chancellordavid @thephotosociety
Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - barn owl chick, Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland- on our rounds today we found this little guy had fallen out of one of the nest boxes, he’s now back with his 5 siblings. I’ll be watching them grow and then fledge over coming weeks. You can just see the characteristic heart shaped face, and the flight feathers underneath the fluffy down which helps them keep warm, and therefore allows the female to leave the nest and help the male with hunting duties. The barn owl is nocturnal over most of its range, but in Britain and some Pacific islands, it also hunts by day. Barn owls specialise in hunting animals on the ground and nearly all of their food consists of small mammals which they locate by sound. They mate for life unless one of the pair is killed, when a new pair bond may be formed. Breeding takes place at varying times of year according to locality, with a clutch, averaging about four eggs, being laid in a nest in a hollow tree, old building or fissure in a cliff. Most bird species don’t start to incubate their eggs until the clutch is complete, so the eggs hatch at more or less the same time. But Barn Owls begin incubation as soon as the first egg is laid and lay additional eggs over a period of around 8-21 days. After 31-32 days’ incubation, the eggs hatch every 2-3 days, usually in the order they were laid. This is termed “asynchronous” hatching. The age difference between the oldest and youngest nestlings can be as much as three weeks. This age variation serves to reduce the peak in food demand and spread it over a longer period. The female does all the incubation and the male provides all the food until the young are around 3 weeks old which is roughly the age of this owlet. Barn owls do not strictly speaking build a nest but rather lay their eggs onto the previous years nest debris, a compacted layer of owl pellets, having nest boxes distributed around the Estate always the owls to return the same site and the estate is therefore more easily able to monitor the health of populations - To see more from this wild and wonderful landscape follow me here @chancellordavid@thephotosociety
224355 likes 930 comments
18h ago
@natgeo
photo by: @renaeffendiphoto 
Women slide down the rocks of the Suleyman Mountain, which many believe has healing powers and can cure ailments ranging from back problems to infertility. Osh, Kyrgyzstan. #women #dailylife #kyrgyzstan #mountains #places #healing
photo by: @renaeffendiphoto Women slide down the rocks of the Suleyman Mountain, which many believe has healing powers and can cure ailments ranging from back problems to infertility. Osh, Kyrgyzstan. #women#dailylife#kyrgyzstan#mountains#places#healing
158838 likes 408 comments
21h ago
@natgeo
Photo by @ciriljazbec / Freeze-dried laundry hangs from a line in the village of Nuugaatsiaq, home to about 60 people, who support themselves mostly by hunting and fishing. Half the houses stand empty: Greenland’s small villages are slowly dying as people abandon the old ways for new opportunities in larger towns to the south. / Deeply honoured to win the 2018 Visura Grant on Climate Change. It is a dream come true having a first solo exhibition in NYC at the United Photo Industries Gallery this June. Welcome to see the exhibition until 29th June and also join me at the artist talk on 19th June. Follow more about this work and the exhibition @ciriljazbec
Photo by @ciriljazbec / Freeze-dried laundry hangs from a line in the village of Nuugaatsiaq, home to about 60 people, who support themselves mostly by hunting and fishing. Half the houses stand empty: Greenland’s small villages are slowly dying as people abandon the old ways for new opportunities in larger towns to the south. / Deeply honoured to win the 2018 Visura Grant on Climate Change. It is a dream come true having a first solo exhibition in NYC at the United Photo Industries Gallery this June. Welcome to see the exhibition until 29th June and also join me at the artist talk on 19th June. Follow more about this work and the exhibition @ciriljazbec
202597 likes 473 comments
21h ago
@natgeo
Image by @beverlyjoubert. Liquid eyes staring patiently from a bush, waiting for the pride to come back from a hunt. Little cubs are full of energy and want desperately to play, but they know that without the protection of the adults, they cannot stray on their own. They learn discipline from a very young age. #littlebigcats #lioncub #bigeyes
Image by @beverlyjoubert. Liquid eyes staring patiently from a bush, waiting for the pride to come back from a hunt. Little cubs are full of energy and want desperately to play, but they know that without the protection of the adults, they cannot stray on their own. They learn discipline from a very young age. #littlebigcats#lioncub#bigeyes
671056 likes 2329 comments
24h ago
@natgeo
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Matt Redd rounding up cattle in some of the most dramatic light I’ve ever seen, on the Dugout Ranch in Indian Creek, Utah (now owned and operated by the Nature Conservancy). On assignment covering the reduction of #BearsEarsNationalMonument and Escalante National Monument for  Nat Geo magazine.  Follow @argonautphoto for more images from this heated battle over our Public lands.
Photo by @argonautphoto (Aaron Huey). Matt Redd rounding up cattle in some of the most dramatic light I’ve ever seen, on the Dugout Ranch in Indian Creek, Utah (now owned and operated by the Nature Conservancy). On assignment covering the reduction of #BearsEarsNationalMonument and Escalante National Monument for Nat Geo magazine. Follow @argonautphoto for more images from this heated battle over our Public lands.
285644 likes 649 comments
1d ago
@natgeo
Photo by @stephenwilkes. The beauty of being awake at sunrise. Early morning fog while traveling to shoot at Stonehenge. 
To see more photos from my travels near and far, visit me @stephenwilkes.
#DayToNight #StephenWilkes #Stonehenge  #sunrise #UK
Photo by @stephenwilkes. The beauty of being awake at sunrise. Early morning fog while traveling to shoot at Stonehenge. To see more photos from my travels near and far, visit me @stephenwilkes.#DayToNight#StephenWilkes#Stonehenge#sunrise#UK
404285 likes 812 comments
1d ago
@natgeo
Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Mingsha Shan - the Singing Sand Dunes of Dunhuang - 700 years ago Marco Polo described the sound of the wind blowing over this mountain of sand as sounding like singing. The name stuck. Here tourists climb the dunes in bright, orange boots making them more visible & keeping the sand out of their shoes, at sunset.  #silkroad #mingshashan #Dunhuang #Gansu #sanddunes #China
Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Mingsha Shan - the Singing Sand Dunes of Dunhuang - 700 years ago Marco Polo described the sound of the wind blowing over this mountain of sand as sounding like singing. The name stuck. Here tourists climb the dunes in bright, orange boots making them more visible & keeping the sand out of their shoes, at sunset. #silkroad#mingshashan#Dunhuang#Gansu#sanddunes#China
311249 likes 638 comments
1d ago
@natgeo
Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio 
Channelling Wes Anderson somewhere on the Furka Pass in southern Switzerland... The Hotel Belvédère, once an idyllic  spot for travellers wanting to explore the nearby Rhône Glacier.  The 11,000 year old glacier is receding at a rate of approximately 130 feet a year, and as the glacier melts away from the pass, fewer people visit. The hotel is now closed indefinitely. Passers-by still stop to take pictures of the building and its mountainous backdrop, yet the building now stands with its doors and windows boarded-up, a testament to the passage of time and the impact of climate change.
Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material.

@simonnorfolkstudio @natgeo 
#accidentalwesanderson #grandhotelbudapest #projectpressure #photojournalism #documentaryphotography #simonnorfolk #glacier #Switzerland #glacialmelt #climatechange #change #glaciers #lensculture#hotelbelvedere #abandonedhotel #rhoneglacier #globalwarming #greenpeace @projectpressure #savetheplanet
Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio Channelling Wes Anderson somewhere on the Furka Pass in southern Switzerland... The Hotel Belvédère, once an idyllic spot for travellers wanting to explore the nearby Rhône Glacier. The 11,000 year old glacier is receding at a rate of approximately 130 feet a year, and as the glacier melts away from the pass, fewer people visit. The hotel is now closed indefinitely. Passers-by still stop to take pictures of the building and its mountainous backdrop, yet the building now stands with its doors and windows boarded-up, a testament to the passage of time and the impact of climate change. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. @simonnorfolkstudio@natgeo#accidentalwesanderson#grandhotelbudapest#projectpressure#photojournalism#documentaryphotography#simonnorfolk#glacier#Switzerland#glacialmelt#climatechange#change#glaciers#lensculture#hotelbelvedere#abandonedhotel#rhoneglacier#globalwarming#greenpeace@projectpressure#savetheplanet
514735 likes 2029 comments