National Geographic Travel
@natgeotravel

It’s a big world. Explore it through the lens of our photographers.

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Photo by @jonathan_irish / Machu Picchu is one of those places that never fails to impress. I’ve been here three or four times now, and each time it blows me away. It’s one of those special places that really lives up to its reputation. There’s always a rush to see the sunrise, with people lining up at 4 a.m. to get in the first busses to the entrance (which opens at 6 a.m.). But from my perspective, the best time to photograph this amazing wonder is near sunset when the crowds are almost nonexistent and the light is just as good as sunrise. Follow me @jonathan_irish for more images like this and around the world.
Photo by @jonathan_irish / Machu Picchu is one of those places that never fails to impress. I’ve been here three or four times now, and each time it blows me away. It’s one of those special places that really lives up to its reputation. There’s always a rush to see the sunrise, with people lining up at 4 a.m. to get in the first busses to the entrance (which opens at 6 a.m.). But from my perspective, the best time to photograph this amazing wonder is near sunset when the crowds are almost nonexistent and the light is just as good as sunrise. Follow me @jonathan_irish for more images like this and around the world.
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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) // A geologist carefully enters a small chamber containing stunning cloud-like cave formations known as mammillaries. These formed underwater at times when the lake was much higher than it is today. The formations that look like lion tails (i.e., white stalactites with orange bulbs on the end) formed close to the water surface, with the white part being above water and the orange part being just below the water surface. This contrast between the orange and white formations can give you an idea of where the level of the lake was in the past. Lechuguilla is part of the Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico. It is a very beautiful and highly protected cave. Access is very strongly controlled and only given to experienced cavers with specific scientific or exploration goals within certain parts of the cave. @natgeocreative
Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) // A geologist carefully enters a small chamber containing stunning cloud-like cave formations known as mammillaries. These formed underwater at times when the lake was much higher than it is today. The formations that look like lion tails (i.e., white stalactites with orange bulbs on the end) formed close to the water surface, with the white part being above water and the orange part being just below the water surface. This contrast between the orange and white formations can give you an idea of where the level of the lake was in the past. Lechuguilla is part of the Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico. It is a very beautiful and highly protected cave. Access is very strongly controlled and only given to experienced cavers with specific scientific or exploration goals within certain parts of the cave. @natgeocreative
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Photo @ladzinski / A #CheshireMoon setting as the sun prepares to rise on the fiery horizon. The timing of this photo was pure luck, I was visiting the Red Lagoon in northwest #Argentina to photograph #flamingos, arriving about an hour and a half before sunrise to stealthily approach the sleeping birds. Swipe to see a couple photos from later in the morning. The smiling crescent moon stole the show and distracted me for easily 30 minutes as I shifted my focus to this beautiful scene. The name Cheshire moon comes from the Cheshire Cat, it’s also referred to as a #wetMoon. To see more photos from this beautiful part of the planet please visit @ladzinski
Photo @ladzinski / A #CheshireMoon setting as the sun prepares to rise on the fiery horizon. The timing of this photo was pure luck, I was visiting the Red Lagoon in northwest #Argentina to photograph #flamingos, arriving about an hour and a half before sunrise to stealthily approach the sleeping birds. Swipe to see a couple photos from later in the morning. The smiling crescent moon stole the show and distracted me for easily 30 minutes as I shifted my focus to this beautiful scene. The name Cheshire moon comes from the Cheshire Cat, it’s also referred to as a #wetMoon. To see more photos from this beautiful part of the planet please visit @ladzinski
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Photo @stephen_matera // (swipe to see the full image) Looking down the spine of the North Cascades from the summit of 8,681' Sahale Peak. From left to right are Mt. Baker, Eldorado Peak, Forbidden, and Boston Peak. Forbidden Peak is on the list of 50 classic mountain climbs in North America. The North Cascades are a rugged wilderness of thick old growth forests, rock, and ice with over 300 active glaciers. Follow me @stephen_matera for more images like this from Washington and around the world. #northcascades #mountaineering #glacier
Photo @stephen_matera // (swipe to see the full image) Looking down the spine of the North Cascades from the summit of 8,681' Sahale Peak. From left to right are Mt. Baker, Eldorado Peak, Forbidden, and Boston Peak. Forbidden Peak is on the list of 50 classic mountain climbs in North America. The North Cascades are a rugged wilderness of thick old growth forests, rock, and ice with over 300 active glaciers. Follow me @stephen_matera for more images like this from Washington and around the world. #northcascades#mountaineering#glacier
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Photo by @FransLanting A young cheetah’s raspy tongue cleans his brother's cheeks stained with blood after they ate a gazelle caught by their mother. When cheetahs become independent after a childhood of a year and a half, males often stay together as a hunting coalition, but females become solitary and are faced with the double duty of hunting and caring for young. Go to @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom to see some of our favorite cheetah family images and learn more about their plight in life. @Natgeocreative @Thephotosociety #Cheetah #BigCats #BigCatsInitiative #Endangered #Wildlifephotography
Photo by @FransLanting A young cheetah’s raspy tongue cleans his brother's cheeks stained with blood after they ate a gazelle caught by their mother. When cheetahs become independent after a childhood of a year and a half, males often stay together as a hunting coalition, but females become solitary and are faced with the double duty of hunting and caring for young. Go to @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom to see some of our favorite cheetah family images and learn more about their plight in life. @Natgeocreative@Thephotosociety#Cheetah#BigCats#BigCatsInitiative#Endangered#Wildlifephotography
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photo by @andrea_frazzetta // Jagir waterfall is located in Kampung Anyar Village, in the Ijen Plateau Volcanic Area on the island of Java, Indonesia. 
The Ijen Volcano has become an unmissable destination for all the tourists visiting the island of Java. Every year more and more travelers are reaching the crater to explore its unique scenario.
Indonesia is situated on the Ring of Fire—a 25,000-mile seismically active belt of volcanoes and tectonic plate boundaries that frame the Pacific basin. About five million Indonesians live and work near active volcanoes, where farming soil is most fertile. Java alone is home to 141 million people—one of the most densely populated islands on Earth.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website and follow @andrea_frazzetta to know more about this story #natgeotravel #ijen #java #jagirwaterfall #indonesia
photo by @andrea_frazzetta // Jagir waterfall is located in Kampung Anyar Village, in the Ijen Plateau Volcanic Area on the island of Java, Indonesia. The Ijen Volcano has become an unmissable destination for all the tourists visiting the island of Java. Every year more and more travelers are reaching the crater to explore its unique scenario. Indonesia is situated on the Ring of Fire—a 25,000-mile seismically active belt of volcanoes and tectonic plate boundaries that frame the Pacific basin. About five million Indonesians live and work near active volcanoes, where farming soil is most fertile. Java alone is home to 141 million people—one of the most densely populated islands on Earth. “Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website and follow @andrea_frazzetta to know more about this story #natgeotravel#ijen#java#jagirwaterfall#indonesia
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Video by @taylorglenn // A seabird's view of sunset on the incredible Mendocino coast of California. Follow @taylorglenn for  more magic hour imagery from around the globe. #california #hwy1 #sunset #aerial #pacificocean
Video by @taylorglenn // A seabird's view of sunset on the incredible Mendocino coast of California. Follow @taylorglenn for more magic hour imagery from around the globe. #california#hwy1#sunset#aerial#pacificocean
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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.
Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo.#everglades#expedition#FloridaWild#KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt@joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.
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Photo by @babaktafreshi 
The World at Night project 
Meteora looks otherworldly in day or night. This World Heritage site in Greece appears here at dusk when I just began a long imaging session to the morning, walking under stars and these giant sandstone rock pillars. Meteora is a complex of unusual monasteries built on top and inside the rocks, some a thousand years old. 
Follow me @babaktafreshi to explore more of the hidden beauties of darkness. 
#greece #meteora #nightphotography #twilight @natgeo @natgeocreative
Photo by @babaktafreshi The World at Night project Meteora looks otherworldly in day or night. This World Heritage site in Greece appears here at dusk when I just began a long imaging session to the morning, walking under stars and these giant sandstone rock pillars. Meteora is a complex of unusual monasteries built on top and inside the rocks, some a thousand years old. Follow me @babaktafreshi to explore more of the hidden beauties of darkness. #greece#meteora#nightphotography#twilight@natgeo@natgeocreative
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Photo by @amivitale. A boy rests after paddling along the Brahmaputra river in the northwestern chars of #Bangladesh, on the edge of the world’s largest #mangrove forest, the #Sunderbans. Follow @amivitale for more images from around the world. 
@natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #water #freshwater #conservation #amivitale #photojournalism #latergram #sealevelrise
Photo by @amivitale. A boy rests after paddling along the Brahmaputra river in the northwestern chars of #Bangladesh, on the edge of the world’s largest #mangrove forest, the #Sunderbans. Follow @amivitale for more images from around the world. @natgeo@natgeocreative@thephotosociety#water#freshwater#conservation#amivitale#photojournalism#latergram#sealevelrise
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Photo by @michaelclarkphoto // To see the extreme sometimes you have to go to extremes. Riding a jet ski while capturing surfers on one of the biggest waves in the world at Peahi, also known as JAWS, on the north shore of Maui. #maui #peahi #jaws #bigwavesurfing
Photo by @michaelclarkphoto // To see the extreme sometimes you have to go to extremes. Riding a jet ski while capturing surfers on one of the biggest waves in the world at Peahi, also known as JAWS, on the north shore of Maui. #maui#peahi#jaws#bigwavesurfing
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Photo by @TimLaman (Tim Laman) // Sponsored by @GoPro // Captured on @GoPro #ExperienceDifferent // Deep in the rain forest of Indonesian Borneo, I wanted to capture a unique perspective–a wide view of an orangutan in the forest canopy. When the wild orangutan I was following went up this tree, I got an idea. There were a lot of ripe figs in the canopy above, so I was pretty sure the orangutan would come back again the next day. After he left, I climbed the tree using ropes and attached a GoPro camera aiming down at this angle. The next morning, sure enough, the orangutan came back. I triggered the camera using Wi-Fi from my iPhone as the orangutan climbed up the trunk and captured this view.
Photo by @TimLaman (Tim Laman) // Sponsored by @GoPro // Captured on @GoPro#ExperienceDifferent // Deep in the rain forest of Indonesian Borneo, I wanted to capture a unique perspective–a wide view of an orangutan in the forest canopy. When the wild orangutan I was following went up this tree, I got an idea. There were a lot of ripe figs in the canopy above, so I was pretty sure the orangutan would come back again the next day. After he left, I climbed the tree using ropes and attached a GoPro camera aiming down at this angle. The next morning, sure enough, the orangutan came back. I triggered the camera using Wi-Fi from my iPhone as the orangutan climbed up the trunk and captured this view.
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